FAQ’s

How do I establish service with the water authority?

To establish services, please visit the Authority office during our business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

  • If you are renting, a copy of the first and last pages of the lease agreement must be presented at the Authority office along with proof of identification, a brief rental application will need to be completed and a deposit paid by check or cash (please contact the Authority office for the deposit amount).  An application can be accessed by clicking on the link below.
  • If you are a property owner, a brief application must be completed and presented at the Authority office along with proof of identification.  An application can be accessed online by clicking on the link below.  No deposit is required.

Rental Application for Water/Sewer Service

Property Owner Application for Water/Sewer Service

Bills are sent on a bi-monthly basis. The next bi-monthly reading scheduled for the property will generate your first bill.

 

Are there any special requirements when I sell my home?

Yes, every residence in the Hampton Shaler Water Authority system is required to have a dual check backflow preventer installed directly after the water meter.  If you do not know if you have one, please contact our office and we would be happy to schedule a serviceman to verify.  Failure to comply with this requirement may result in a delay of your closing.

You can click on the links below for more information.

Residential Backflow Preventer Letter

Residential Backflow Form

 

How do I discontinue service from my residence?
If you need to discontinue service at your residence, please contact the Authority during business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, to schedule your appointment for a final reading. The office telephone number is 412-486-4867. When you call, you will need to have the following information:

  1. Your account number and/or service address
  2. The date you need to have your service discontinued
  3. Your forwarding address for the final bill

A representative of the Authority will be at the service address as pre-arranged. We are able to specify either a morning appointment, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., or an afternoon appointment, 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. The water will not be turned off unless specifically requested. Therefore, the service is automatically transferred to the new owners as of the date of the final reading. A final bill is usually generated within two weeks after the final reading has been taken.

 

What are the HSWA billing procedures?
The Authority issues a bi-monthly bill, which is due 20 days after remittance. Any charges not paid within this timeframe will be assessed a 10% late fee. These charges will appear on a Reminder Notice and are due within 15 days of issuance. If you feel you have received a Reminder Notice in error, please contact the Authority at 412-486-4867.
Outstanding charges not paid through the Reminder Notice will result in the Authority posting the property with a termination notice. If a payment and/or payment arrangement has not been made by the date of termination, service will be discontinued.
If your service is discontinued for nonpayment, a turn-on fee will be assessed to your account. The turn-on fee is $75.00 during business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, and $135.00 at all other times.
Any questions and/or discrepancies concerning your bill should be directed to the office staff by calling 412-486-4867.

 

What is the current Rate Schedule?

 

What are the current tapping fees?

 

How are sewer charges calculated into my water bill?
The Hampton Shaler Water Authority does not maintain the sewer system, but we do provide a billing and collection service for the Townships of Hampton and Shaler, the Borough of Etna, as well as a portion of Indiana, O’Hara and McCandless Townships. This allows most residents to pay for both water and sewer services on one bi-monthly statement. Even though the Authority does sewer billing for the Townships of Hampton, Shaler, O’Hara, Indiana, McCandless and Etna Borough, they do have separate sewer usage rates. The rates listed below are per a bi-monthly bill:

Township of Hampton– Customers are billed for sewer use based on their actual water consumption. The rate is $3.36 per 1,000 gallons for the first 10,000 gallons sewer usage. Thereafter, the rate increases to $5.64 per 1,000 gallons. There is a $28.92 ready-to-serve charge, which is included and payable whether or not there is any usage. If you have any questions regarding the sewer system, please direct your call to Hampton Township at 412-486-0400 during business hours and 412-486-0900 after hours.

Borough of Etna – Customers are billed for sewer use based on their actual water consumption. The rate is $10.41 per 1,000 gallons sewer usage. There is a ready-to-serve charge of $15.50, which is included and payable whether or not there is any usage. If you have any questions regarding the sewer system, please direct your call to the Borough of Etna at 412-781-0569 during business hours.

Borough of Etna Garbage Collection – Etna is the only area that we bill for garbage collection. Customers are billed $37.00 per bi-monthly bill. Seniors (65 yrs. & older) are billed $33.00 per bi-monthly bill. If you have any questions regarding your garbage collection, please direct your call to Waste Management at 1-800-458-4090.

Township of O’Hara – Customers are billed for sewer use based on their actual water consumption. The rate is $9.16 per 1,000 gallons sewer usage. There is a ready-to-serve charge of $13.44, which is included and payable whether or not there is any usage. If you have any questions regarding the sewer system, please direct your call to O’Hara Township at 412-782-1400 during business hours.

Township of Indiana – Customers are billed for sewer use based on their actual water consumption. The rate is $8.16 per 1,000 gallons sewer usage. There is a ready-to-serve charge of $9.67, which is included and payable whether or not there is any usage. If you have any questions regarding the sewer system, please direct your call to Indiana Township at 412-767-5333 during business hours.

McCandless Township Sanitary Authority – Customers are billed for sewer use based on their actual water consumption. The rate is $6.90 per 1,000 gallons sewer usage. Non-residential customers pay $8.45 per 1,000 gallons sewer usage. There is a ready-to-serve charge of $14.17, which is included and payable whether or not there is any usage. If you have any questions regarding the sewer system, please direct your call to McCandless Sanitary Authority at 412-364-2119 during business and after hours.

Township of Shaler – This area is served by the following:

ALCOSAN (Allegheny County Sanitary Authority) Sewer Service: This charge is assessed by ALCOSAN and is for the treatment of sanitary sewer waste. Shaler Township does not maintain facilities for solid waste treatment. Shaler Township contracts with ALCOSAN to provide this service to the residents of Shaler Township. Customers are billed for sewer use based on their actual water consumption. The rate is $6.91 per 1,000 gallons sewer usage. There is a $9.67 ready-to-serve charge, which is included and payable whether or not there is any usage. If you have any questions regarding the sewer system, please direct your call to ALCOSAN at 412-766-6696.

Shaler Sewer Charges or Girty’s Run Sewer Charges: Residents of Shaler Township reside in either the Girty’s Run or Shaler Township sewer area. Residents are charged one of the above charges but cannot be charged for both. Your service area is noted in the summary of charges on your bi-monthly water/sewer bill. These charges are assessed to maintain the sanitary sewer lines used to transport the solid waste to the ALCOSAN treatment plant. Current charges for either of these services areas follows:

Shaler Sewer Charge: Bi-monthly customer service charge of $6.32 and a per 1,000 gallon charge of $2.00.

Girty’s Sewer Charge: $2.50 per 1,000 gallons. Bi-monthly customer service charge of $8.50 (includes 3,000 gallons of usage). Girty’s Run charges are assessed by the Girty’s Run Joint Sewer Authority. Questions regarding these rates should be directed to 412-821-3497.

The Townships of Hampton, Shaler, O’Hara, Indiana and McCandless allow the use of a sewer deduct meter. This meter is purchased from the Authority at a cost of $238.75 and is installed by your plumber on the waterline dedicated to your outside watering. After your plumber has installed the deduct meter, please call the Authority for an inspection and the installation of a reading device. If you have this meter installed, you are not billed for the sewer portion for any usage that passes through this meter.

 

What To Do When Your Water Is Discolored

In the event of a water break or sometimes from flushing our system, minerals get stirred up and create discolored water.  The link below gives you some advice on what to do.

What To Do When Your Water Is Discolored

 

How do I acquire and review public records consistent with the Pennsylvania Right-To-Know Law of 2008?

The procedure is in the Authority’s Open Records Policy which you can review by clicking on the link below.

Request for Public Information Form

HSWA Open Records Policy

 

What kind of health information is available regarding our drinking water?
The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled) include rivers, lakes, streams, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material. Water can also pick up microscopic organisms resulting from the presence of humans and animals.

Contaminants that may be present in your source water include:
• Microbial contaminants such as viruses and bacteria which may come from septic systems, agricultural livestock and wildlife.
• Inorganic contaminants such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from man-made activities such as mining, industry or gas production.
• Pesticides and herbicides which come from a variety of sources such as agricultural and residential use.
• Organic contaminants including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production.
• Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be a result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

The Hampton Shaler Water Authority, as well as their bulk suppliers, routinely monitor for a wide array of contaminants according to Federal and State laws. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. It’s important to remember that the presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Maximum contaminant levels set by Federal and State regulations are set at stringent levels for health effects. Keep in mind that the drinking water supplied to you by the Authority has met all of the stringent State and Federal standards.

 

What is the current water quality report?

 

What components of my plumbing should I be familiar with?

Your plumbing includes all of the pipes and fixtures on your property, from the meter or valve near the street to the faucets inside your home. Here are a few important components to be familiar with:

Main Water Valve: This valve is normally located where the water line enters your home through the foundation. It can be used to shut the water off in an emergency or when plumbing improvements are being made. It can also be turned off while the property is vacant to prevent water damage that unforeseen leaks might cause. To make sure this valve works properly, turn it off and verify that the water flow to your fixtures has stopped completely. When the valve is turned back on, it should be opened fully to allow unrestricted water flow.

Pressure Reducing Valve: Most houses in the Hampton/Shaler water system are equipped with a pressure-reducing valve (PRV), which is normally located near the main water valve. PRVs are usually bell-shaped devices, approximately 4″ in length, that are designed to keep the water pressure inside your home from exceeding a set limit. This helps prevent “knocking” in pipes and other stresses caused by high pressure. Residential pressure regulators are generally set between 45 and 65 psi.

Water Service Lateral: This is the pipe that runs underground from the meter or valve near the street to the main water valve inside the house. It is typically made of copper. Should your service lateral develop a leak, it is the homeowner’s responsibility to institute the repairs.

Water Meter: Unlike the components above, water meters and their settings are owned and maintained by the Hampton Shaler Water Authority. Most homes are equipped with an inside water meter, which is connected to a remote register on the exterior of the house. In the case of an inside meter setting, the Authority only maintains the water meter and remote reader. Other meters are located near the edge of the property in a small pit covered by a cast iron lid. It is helpful to keep plants, shrubs, and trees trimmed away from the meters and registers to allow us to read and maintain them.

 

How do I detect leaks and conserve water?
  • Make sure no one is using any water in your home. If you have a humidifier on your furnace, make sure it is off before you begin.
  • Looking at the face of the meter, observe the small black or red triangle. If this triangle has any movement, there is a leak in your home.
  • If the triangle has no movement, read the water meter, noting the position of the clock-style hand that records individual gallons.
  • Wait at least 15 minutes without using water.
  • Look at the meter again to see if the hand moved. If it did not, there are probably no leaks. Waiting longer between meter readings (overnight, for instance) might help you detect slow or intermittent leaks.
  • If the meter hand moved, check all of your faucets for visible leaks.
  • Check the toilets for leaks by adding food coloring to the water in the tank. Do not flush. Wait 15 minutes to see if the colored water appears in the toilet bowl. If it does, there is a leak. Repairing toilet leaks is normally inexpensive and easy to do. Replacement part kits are available at most hardware stores.
  • If there appears to be no leaks inside your home, and the meter is located outside, check for underground leaks. Turn off your main valve inside, then open a faucet to verify that the valve is working—the water flow should stop completely. Go back outside to the meter to see if it continues to run with the main valve off. If it does, there is a leak somewhere in your plumbing between the meter and the valve.
  • After making repairs, repeat the meter reading procedure to verify that there are no more leaks.

 

How can I prevent water waste in the bathroom?
  • Check your toilets for leaks.
    Put a little food coloring in your toilet tank. If, without flushing, the color begins to appear in the bowl, you have a leak that should be repaired immediately.
  • Stop using the toilet as an ashtray or wastebasket.
    Every time you flush a cigarette butt, facial tissue, or other small bit of trash, you waste five to seven gallons of water.
  • Put plastic bottles in your toilet tank.
    To cut down on water waste, put an inch or two of sand or pebbles inside each of two plastic bottles to weigh them down. Fill them with water and put them in your toilet tank, safely away from operating mechanisms. In an average home, the bottles may displace and save ten or more gallons of water a day.
  • Take shorter showers.
    Long hot showers can waste five to ten gallons of water every unneeded minute. Limit your showers to the time it takes to soap up, wash down and rinse off.
  • Install water-saving shower heads or flow restrictors.
    Your local hardware or plumbing supply store stocks inexpensive water-saving shower heads or restrictors that are easy to install.
  • Take baths.
    A bath with a partially filled tub uses less water than all but the shortest showers.
  • Turn off the water after you wet your toothbrush.
    There is no need to keep water pouring down the drain. Just wet your brush and fill a glass for mouth rinsing.
  • Rinse your razor in the sink.
    Fill the bottom of the sink with a few inches of warm water. This will rinse your blade just as well as running water and far less wastefully.
  • Check faucets and pipes for leaks.Even the smallest drop from a worn washer can waste 20 gallons a day. Larger leaks can waste hundreds.

 

How can I prevent water waste in the laundry and kitchen?
Use your automatic dishwasher only for full loads.
If you wash dishes by hand, don’t leave the water running for rinsing.
If you have two sinks, fill one with soapy water and one with rinse water. If you have only one sink, gather washed dishes in a dish rack and rinse them with a spray devise or a pan full of hot water.
Don’t let the faucet run while you clean vegetables.Just rinse them in a stoppered sink or a pan of clean water.
Keep a bottle of drinking water in the refrigerator.Running tap water to cool it off for drinking water is wasteful.
Check faucets and pipes for leaks.Leaks waste water 24 hours a day, seven days a week and often can be repaired with only an inexpensive washer.

 

How can I prevent my water pipes from freezing?
  • Open doors to all sinks that are on outside walls and remove clutter around pipes to allow air to circulate through cabinet.
  • Locate your main shut off for the house just in case you need to turn water off.
  • Check around unheated areas of your home where water supply lines may be located such as an unheated garage, attic or crawl space.  Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.  You might want to consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes.
  • In older homes with little or no insulation, you may want to let the hot and cold water faucet drip to prevent freezing.
  • Shut off water to outside hose bibs.
  • If water meter is enclosed, keep door open, remove clutter so warmer air can circulate through area and around meter.

 

How can I prevent water waste outside?
Water your lawn only when it needs it.
A good way to see if your lawn needs watering is to step on the grass. If it springs back up when you move, it doesn’t need water. If it stays flat, fetch the sprinkler.
Deep-soak your lawn.
When you do water, do it long enough for the moisture to soak down to the roots where it will do the most good. A light sprinkling can evaporate quickly and tends to encourage shallow root systems.
Water during the cool parts of the day.
Early morning generally is better than dusk since it helps prevent growth of fungus.
Don’t water the gutter.
Position your sprinklers so water lands on the lawn or garden, not on paved areas. Also avoid watering on windy days.
Plant drought-resistant trees and plants.
Many beautiful trees and plants thrive with far less watering than other species.
Put a layer of mulch around trees and plants.
Mulch will slow evaporation of moisture with far less watering than other species.
Use a broom, not a hose, to clean driveways and sidewalks.
Don’t run the hose while washing your car.
Clean the car with a pail of soapy water. Use the hose just to rinse it off.
Tell children not to play with the hose and sprinkler.
Check for leaks in pipes, hoses, faucets, and couplings. Leaks outside the house may not seem as bad since they’re not as visible. But they can be just as wasteful as leaks inside. Check frequently and keep them drip-free.